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NSX-T Load balancer Deployment Topology

 Introduction to NSX-T Load balancer
Deployment Topology

In the NSX-T Data Center logical load balancer, the network traffic load is distributed among multiple servers to provide high-availability services to applications. Multiple servers are utilized to balance incoming service requests.

Using load balancing, you can map a virtual IP address to a group of pool servers. On the virtual IP address, the load balancer accepts TCP, UDP, HTTP, or HTTPS requests and decides which pool server to use.

NSX-T provides load balancing functionality, but it does so on Tier-1 gateway. Only T1 routers can support LB services, and each T1 gateway can support a single load balancer.

Load balancers can be deployed in either inline or one-arm mode.

One-Arm Topology
The load balancer is not in the path of traffic between the client and the server when in one-arm mode. Both the client and the server are mobile in this mode. In this situation, LB-SNAT is always necessary.

Fig 1.1- NSX-T One Armed Topology

To guarantee that traffic from the server to the clients is routed to the load balancer, source NAT at LB is necessary. Therefore, unless we utilize XFF header for HTTP/HTTPS communication, the servers won't be able to view the clients' actual IP addresses.

Another topic of discussion is health check monitors, which are used to verify that each server is successfully executing. You may install health check monitors to examine the state of a server's health.

Inline Load Topology
The load balancer is in the route of traffic between the client and the server while in inline mode. The same tier-1 logical router cannot be used by clients and servers. In this instance, LB-SNAT is not necessary.

Fig 1.1- NSX-T Inline Topology

In simple words, you can say that, The load balancer is in the route of traffic between the client and the server while in inline mode. If SNAT on the load balancer is not wanted, clients and servers shouldn't be linked to overlay segments on the same tier-1 logical router. 

SNAT is necessary if clients and servers are linked to overlay segments on the same tier-1 logical router.

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